Graphic Novels Worth Teaching
Graphic Novels Worth Teaching

Persepolis

By Marjane Satrapi

It’s likely that you may have already heard of Persepolisthanks to the animated rendition of the book that was critically acclaimed and well rewarded as such. Even more reason to study the book I say, what we have here is a book that not only teaches us the history and political state of Iran in the 60s but also serves as a memoir for its author Marjane Satrapi. Satrapi was born to a middle-class family in Tehran during this era and in this book, we see her life throughout the political upheaval of the country’s Islamic Revolution. After this we see how she and her family cope when they movie to Vienna and are faced with a new culture and as such a new set of double standards.

Palestine

Palestine
Palestine

By Joe Sacco

If you’re attempting to teach your kids about the wars of the Middle East then I feel for you, there’s so much to cover, so many politics, foreign inclusion and a certain lack of justice that are all hard to get across to younger minds. If you’re looking at the ongoing relationship between Israel and Palestine then you have plenty of ground to cover, may I suggest you take a look at Joe Sacco’s Palestine? Sacco is seen as something of a pioneer in when it comes to comics journalism and this is certainly his most continuous project. Essentially, it’s a report on Gaza and the West Bank, it covers Israeli and Arab politics, showing it through a humanistic lens and examines the civilians, farmers, families, children and even children that call this country their home and shows how their lives are affected by foreign policies in the region.

March

March
March

By John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell

The American civil rights movement is an extremely important part of modern history and a huge step towards social equality. Social equality is of course a hot topic at the moment with changes constantly being made in order to further achieve equality between gender and race in almost every aspect of our lives in it’s so important to teach why this is such a crucial point that needs to addressed as soon as possible. March is written by a civil rights icon and American Congressman by the name of John Lewis and it chronicles his incredible life and the part he played in one of America’s most important movements. It tells of his early days on a sharecropper’s farm in Alabama, his learning years spent in a segregated school, the 1963 ‘March on Washington’ (which the book is named after) to his days in Congress. It’s important to teach young learners that the civil rights movement was more than just the efforts of Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X (though of course they are important), it was about an entire race of people and among them we can see so many incredible stories of hardship and inspiration that explain exactly why equality matters. This is one of those stories.